Author Archives: Pat Shelly, Univ. at Buffalo School of Social Work

Transcending Transphobia: Delivering Affirmative Care ~ #MacroSW Chat April 19, 2018

We’re pleased to be hosting this #MacroSW Twitter Chat on transphobia in health and mental health settings. What does affirmative care look like? What are social workers doing to advocate for our transgender clients, colleagues and communities?

The trans flag - blue and pink horizontal stripes - with the caduseus (sign for meidcine - two snakes wrapped around a stick - in the middle and words: DO NO HARM _No Rx for discrimination Image: National Center for Transgender Equality

This week, Fae Johnstone @FaeJohnstone (White, Trans, She, They), a trans organizer and consultant from Ottawa, will help us gain a deeper understanding of the complexities of trans identities. Their talk , titled Stepping Up on Queer and Trans Youth Mental Health, is one of two essential resources for this week’s chat.

Please watch the 24-minute video, Stepping Up. In it, Fae explains basic vocabulary (nonbinary, cissexism, gender identity, assigned gender, etc.), plus the extraordinary and depressing statistics on lgbtq youth mental health. They share their own story of walking out the door every day as a queer trans youth.

The second essential resource for this week’s chat is Affirmative Care for Transgender and Gender Non-Conforming People, with practical tips and training resources.

This chat will give you resources on how to support trans clients, and ideas about how we can collectively address the…

View original post 538 more words

On Social Work and Other Underappreciated Professions that Serve the Common Good

by Elizabeth Bowen, PhD, LCSW

 

logo for 2018 Socia WRok Month shows 3 abstract people with linked arms above the text: Social Workers: leadrs, advocates, champions. Color are dark blue, turquoise and yellow.

Social Work Month 2018 logo – NASW

The murders of social worker Christine Loeber and her colleagues Jennifer Golick and Jennifer Gonzales by a former client at The Pathway Home for veterans in northern California hit me hard. This news was followed by the less widely publicized but equally tragic murder of Anthony Houston, a supervisor of a transitional living program run by the social service organization Thresholds in Chicago. I didn’t know any of these individuals personally; my grief is not that of mourning a personal loss. But I think like for many social workers and social service professionals, this news hit a nerve. I can’t help but think: Could it have been me, or one of my colleagues, my friends, my students, my mentors?

The short answer to that question is yes. This is not to exaggerate concerns about violent behavior from the people with whom social workers work.  My grief in these tragedies is not only for the victims, but also for the individuals accused of committing these crimes—and for the many people who might share diagnostic labels or service needs with the alleged perpetrators and do not engage in violence, but will be unfairly stereotyped as such. Social workers work with a lot of different people in a lot of different settings, and occupational violence is a rarity for most of us. When clients do act out physically or verbally, it does not usually endanger our lives, and as social workers we also recognize that many people who perpetrate violence have experienced their own horrific trauma and abuse.

Social workers, however, are constantly in situations that are at best uncomfortable—and at worst, fatal, as The Pathway Home and Thresholds tragedies indicate. I am a professor now but in my practitioner days I did a lot of home visits with people in supportive housing. I never faced violence directly in my job but I did find myself in difficult situations, like going on a home visit to see a client we had not heard from in several days and finding him unresponsive in his bed. Not every day was like this–there were also plenty of good days, uneventful days, and even great days that left me feeling like I had the best job in the world. I also acknowledge that if some days were hard for me, they were infinitely harder for the clients themselves and their loved ones. I cared deeply about my job but it was ultimately only my job and not my life.

Read more

Financial Capability Building: Mobile Money as an Intervention Going to Scale. Feb. 22, 2018 #MacroSW Chat

We’re pleased to have our @UBSSW faculty member Dr. Nadine (Shaanta) Murshid as the guest expert on this chat – hope you all can join us!

reblogged from https://macrosw.com/  Financial Capability Building: Mobile Money as an Intervention Going to Scale. Feb. 22, 2018 #MacroSW Chat 

money transfer

Imagine you are a woman who begins to work in a garment factory in Dhaka, Bangladesh. You have never received a paycheck or hourly wages for your labor before you were hired for this job. You have never had a banking account. You have minimal financial literacy, such as the knowledge and skills to manage monetary resources effectively, and to make informed financial decisions. You do not know English, the international language of banking and finance. You lack basic information and communications technology. Now what?

Enter the introduction of mobile money: the use of a basic cell phone- not a smart phone – as a technology that addresses the need for banking services for the previously unbanked. It is a method to store, withdraw and transfer money. This innovation was adopted and spread very quickly in Bangladesh, with buy-in from the World Bank and major banking institutions.  Read more Read more

#UsToo?: Sexual Harassment in Social Work Education – #MacroSW Chat Jan. 25, 2018

Original post by Pat Shelly, UBSSW

Due to the most recent light that has been shed on sexual harassment and sexual assault with the #MeToo and #TimesUp hashtags, we will be looking sexual harassment that takes place in schools of social work.

As one of our guest experts for this chat, Dr. Melissa (Missy) Bird, says, “The era of  ‘handling it internally’ must end.”

A former social work Ph.D. student colleague of Missy’s at the University of Southern California filed a complaint against a professor who was found guilty of sexual harassment; he has faced no repercussions and will still be exposed to students. Since Missy blogged about it, many other instances of academic harassment were brought to her attention.

As Macro social workers we have an ethical obligation to publicly address harassment in all of its forms. Given the gender makeup of the profession (89% female), many forms of  harassment and unequal treatment takes place…

View original post 411 more words

« Older Entries