Author Archives: Pat Shelly, Univ. at Buffalo School of Social Work

Innovating Gang Violence Prevention Through Social Media – #MacroSW Chat 11-16-17

We’re hosting this week’s #MacroSW chat – join us as we explore Desmond Patton’s innovative approach for preventing gun violence in Chicago. This is reblogged from macrosw.com .

#MacroSW

Our guest expert this week is Desmond Upton Patton, Ph.D., who will discuss how analyzing Twitter data (though digital qualitative research) can help us understand how social media communications –around grief, trauma, or love– can lead to off-line gun violence.

Street with yellow tape "police line do not cross" tied across it. Red brick buidlings in backgrounc with police car with blue lights on top of it. Photo: Joshua Lott, Getty Images

Using data sets from Chicago, he hopes his research will help prevent murders and provide insight into healthy ways to intervene and cope with trauma. The participation of youth as translators of the tweets – telling the story within the story – help social workers identify moments that are prime for intervention. As an introduction to this chat’s topic, please watch this 12-minute video, a 2017 Ted X Broadway Talk by Dr. Patton:

They Are Children: How Posts on Social Media Lead to Gang Violence

“While social media often portrays a curated version of people’s lives, it can also help tell a more complete…

View original post 243 more words

Using Technology for Social Work Scholarship: Creating and Sharing your Work

Reblogged from:

Laurel Hitchcock’s Blog

 

This post was written and edited by Nancy J. SmythMelanie Sage, and myself as part of our collaboration on our forthcoming book, Teaching Social Work with Digital Technology, to be published by CSWE Press in 2018.

Social and digital technologies offer many tools and opportunities to create and disseminate scholarship in social work.  For example, social work educators can use blogs, podcasts, videos, and infographics to create and share content for professional purposes.  To see an example of how to use infographics, please see Harnessing Technology for Social Work Scholarship (Hitchcock & Sage, 2017).  This blog post describes two social work academics are using social media to share their research with others.

Dr. Jimmy A. Young, an Assistant Professor of social work at California State University San Marcos, shares how he uses social media to disseminate his research:

Social media technologies offer exciting opportunities to disseminate scholarship with a broader audience and share your research with others. A few examples include using Twitter to share a quick highlight or quote with a direct link to the article, a blog post with a longer quote or summary and direct link to the article, or some sort of video message on YouTube or Snapchat that also shares a summary and direct link. Today’s social media users enjoy rich content and video is an engaging way to share articles with others. I have also been successful in using professional academic social networks such as ResearchGate or Academia.edu to host articles, post summaries and links, as well as to connect with others working in a similar area. The great thing about these websites is you can get some analytics that can be useful for demonstrating your scholarly impact. . . .

Read More

Read more

Pioneering the Grand Challenges on Social Media as Macro Practice: #MacroSW at #APM17

I’m pleased to be part of this presentation!
Pat Shelly

#MacroSW

On October 20, 2017,  four of the #MacroSW partners will be in Dallas at the Council of Social Work Education’s 2017 Annual Program Meeting to present about how our online community is supporting the American Academy of Social Work and Social Welfare’s Social Work Grand Challenges.   

Date: Saturday, October 21, 2017

Time: 2:00 PM

Room Assignment: Sheraton Dallas Hotel City View 2, Main Hotel, 4th floor

The presenters include:

This presentation, titled Pioneering the Grand Challenges on Social Media as Macro Practice, will inform…

View original post 905 more words

Ableism In Social Work: Working Toward Inclusion – Oct. 5, 2017 #MacroSW Chat

We’re proud to have one of our UBSSW #MSW students, Matt Schwartz, lead this chat about how social workers can more effectively support the colleagues we work beside and the students we teach who have a disability – visible or not. Reblogged from https://macrosw.com/

#MacroSW

By @TheMattSchwartz – Matthew L. Schwartz, #MacroSW Contributor

nothing about us without usRicardoLevinsMoralesImage: Ricardo Levins Morales

The National Association of Social Workers’ slogan for its 2017 Social Work Month campaign was, “Social Workers Stand Up!”

Social Workers stand up with the words "Social workers" in red lettters on top of "stand". The 'd' in stand points up in an arrow shape- this is in green-blue letters.NASW Social Work Month 2017 logo

For me, this slogan highlighted the need to address the use of ableist language and ableism within our profession.

WASHINGTON, DC – JUNE 22: U.S. Capitol Police remove protesters from in front of the office of Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell (R-KY) inside the Russell Senate Office Building on Capitol Hill, on June 22, 2017 in Washington, DC. Members of a group with disabilities were protesting the proposed GOP health care plan that was unveiled today. (Photo by Mark Wilson/Getty Images)

Many social workers cannot stand up (though they can certainly advocate).

"Social Worker" is signed by a man against green background, with the words social worker superimposed. Source: Sign with Robert

Additionally, many social workers cannot speak out, though they can definitely protest using Sign Language or other means…

View original post 860 more words

Sustainability and Social Work: Earth Day 2017

by Pat Shelly

Sustainability and Environmentalism

“Use it up, wear it out, make it do, or do without.” This is an old Yankee/New England proverb that resounds with our more environmentally-conscious society today.

Sustainability is  a word that appears more frequently in the press around Earth Day, which is observed on April 22 in the US. Many slogans address environmental issues. Some instruct: “Reduce, Reuse, Recyle,” or humorously inform: “Recyclers do it over and over again,” or recommend:

 

Smiling man in baseball cap with arms hugging a big tree. Only one arm is visible as tree's circumference is too large to encircle with his arms. is too big to get

Photo: Carolina Hoyos Lievano / World Bank

 

 

 

 

 

“Hug a tree, they have fewer issues than people.”

 

 

 

Read more

« Older Entries