Author Archives: Pat Shelly, Univ. at Buffalo School of Social Work

Medicare Open Enrollment: Programmatic and Policy Concerns. October 11, 2018 #MacroSW Chat

Great Twitter Chat with our own Dr. Louanne Bakk!

by Pat Shelly @UBSSW

Image of "Medicare Health Insurance" over image of a maze.

Transcript of this chat here.

The annual Open Enrollment period for Medicare is from October 15 – December 7.
It is important for all social workers to be aware of the basics of Medicare coverage and current program changes and policy concerns.

We are pleased to have Louanne Bakk, PhD, MSW,   @BakkLouanne  the Director of the DSW Program and Clinical Assistant Professor at the University of Buffalo School of Social Work as the guest expert for this chat. Her past work as Director of Access and Aging Benefits at an agency  in Michigan influenced her current research in healthcare access disparities and older adults.

Learn about the Medicare basics, Open Enrollment, associated costs, policy issues, and how to help beneficiaries pick the best plan.

chart: Gateway Health Plan

chart of part a services costs co-payservices costs co-pay for part B

Charts: Medicare Part A and Part B from Louanne Bakk / University at Buffalo

Discussion Questions

  1. What are…

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Voter Engagement: A social work mandate

By Christina Cerruti, MSW student

“Voting is an act of power and form of empowerment,” Tanya Rhodes Smith, MSW, Director of the Nancy A. Humphreys Institute for Political Social Work at the University of Connecticut, told a group of more than 75 social workers during a Voter Engagement Teach-in held on Capitol Hill  in June.

3 people holding sign in front of the Capitol

Photo: NASW

 

Smith was one of four panelists who shared their views on why voting matters at all levels of social work practice.  The teach-in was a pre-conference event during the National Association of Social Workers (NASW) 2018 National Conference   held June 20th – 23rd.

 

 

A scholarship from the University at Buffalo School of Social Work  (UBSSW) allowed me to attend the annual 3½ day event, which featured keynote speakers, panel presentations, plenary and breakout sessions, and many opportunities to network and learn from the more than 2,000 social workers.

 

Cerruti stands under welcome banner to #NASW18

Christina Cerruti at #NASW18. Photo: from author

This year’s theme, “Shaping Tomorrow Together,” highlighted the critical role of unity in addressing many current social and political issues in the U.S. Although a number of different issues and topics within the field of social work were discussed, the importance of voting and voter engagement were recurring themes throughout the conference.

feet in red white blus sneakers form in word VOTE chalked on asphalt

Photo courtesy Theresa Thompson through Creative Commons License CC BY 2.0

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Open Mic/Summer Self-Care Chat: #MacroSW 7/26 at 9pm EST

What are your special summer self-care tips? Join the #MacroSW chat, the last before our August break.

Once again, we reach that time of year when  #MacroSW will go on vacation for the month of August. Come prepared to share your favorite summer self-care, including books you have tucked away in your beach bag or on your tablet, favorite summer recipes or treats, music or video playlists, and travel or staycation plans. For ideas check out our media list created during a previous open mic/summer self-care chat. Bring your best gifs and memes!

#MacroSW will take a break for the month of August and return on Thursday, September 6, 2018.

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#MacroSW chat for 7/12/2018 at 9 pm Eastern: Social work leadership in the face of ethical policy conflicts.

Important questions for these times. Join the discussion!

via #MacroSW chat for 7/12/2018 at 9 pm Eastern: Social work leadership in the face of ethical policy conflicts.

When Chief of Staff John Kelly was interviewed by NPR last year, the Zero Tolerance policy was referenced: “They’ll be put into foster care….or something”.  The quote went viral.

7 - 12 - 2018 Instagram Post.png

As social workers, we may detect a few layers of implied meaning in this statement. First: In this instance, social work practice is presumed to function as a mere cog to further larger policy goals. Second:  those policy goals run counter to ethical practice. Third: that these policy goals may not be deeply considered (the “or something” in this statement). Foster care is a part of a complex system of child and family support, not an ends to a means (in this case, attempt to deter immigration by breaking families apart).
Earlier this summer, our #MacroSW chat focused on the ongoing crisis of U.S. Immigration Policy. Specifically, we discussed the humanitarian crisis of separating children from their families. Regardless of political affiliation or identity, it’s clear that social workers, particularly those dedicated to the mission as outlined in our Code of Ethics, oppose this practice, regardless of the fact that its the policy of currently practiced by a country some of us call our home. The National Association of Social Workers worked to intervene in this crisis by supporting social work volunteers to help immigrant children separated from their families. NASW also produced a social justice brief on the subject. This is an important stance, particularly as reports emerged in June that social work intervention with children who cross the border may be manipulated to cause further harm….
Continue reading here: https://macrosw.com/2018/07/10/macrosw-chat-for-7-12-2018-at-9-pm-eastern-social-work-leadership-in-the-face-of-ethical-policy-conflicts/

#MacroSW chat for 7/12/2018 at 9 pm Eastern: Social work leadership in the face of ethical policy conflicts.

Important questions for our profession in these times.

7 - 12 - 2018 Instagram Post.png

When Chief of Staff John Kelley was interviewed by NPR last year, this policy was referenced, “They’ll be put into foster care….or something”.  The quote went viral.

As social workers, we may detect a few layers of implied meaning in this statement. First: In this instance, social work practice is presumed to function as a mere cog to further larger policy goals. Second:  those policy goals run counter to ethical practice. Third: that these policy goals may not be deeply considered (the “or something” in this statement). Foster care is a part of a complex system of child and family support, not an ends to a means (in this case, attempt to deter immigration by breaking families apart).
Earlier this summer, our #MacroSW chat focused on the ongoing crisis of U.S. Immigration Policy. Specifically, we discussed the humanitarian crisis of separating children from their families. Regardless of political affiliation…

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