Author Archives: Pat Shelly, Univ. at Buffalo School of Social Work

Open Channels: If, When, and How to Communicate Social Work Research Beyond Academic Outlets

Editor’s note: We’re very pleased to re-blog this post by JaeRan Kim, Ph.D. Below are details of the roundtable that was part of the Society for Social Work Research 2018 Annual Conference.

Roots Wings Roundtable - open channels_Page_1

Roots Wings Roundtable - open channels_Page_2

JaeRan Kim

I’m in Washington, D.C. for a social work conference, and yesterday I participated on a panel as part of the SSWR‘s Roots and Wings Roundtable series. The conversation was about alternative modes of sharing scholarship beyond the traditional academic audience of peer review journals.

I really enjoy these conversations and this one was no exception. There were many important points made and I wanted to highlight some of the questions and concerns that were raised:

  • The feedback loops that scholars can receive when sharing their research in the communities they are studying can be constructive (e.g. you’re going the wrong way, asking the wrong questions) and generative (i.e. here is what we want you to study). In my work, I have benefitted from both constructive and generative feedback.
  • Does depth and complexity get lost in communication beyond academic outlets? I think it can, but it doesn’t have to be…

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Indigenous Communities, Human Rights and Environmental (In)Justice

By Meschelle Linjean

 

Social workers are charged with advancing human rights and social, economic, and environmental justice. We advocate for the rights of vulnerable populations and against any policies, practices, and attitudes that jeopardize anyone’s life, liberty, and security of person. Grave social, economic, and environmental injustices take place in the name of corporate development and greed.

 

This blog post looks at the ways extractive industry development (e.g., oil and gas extraction, mining, logging) in Indigenous homelands in the Americas often result in displacement, poisoning and desecration of the land and water, and contributes to high rates of sexual assault, sex trafficking, and murder.  The beneficiaries are wealthy outsiders, corporations and shareholders. Deep ecology, ecofeminism, empowerment theory, and trauma-informed perspectives are all insightful lenses through which these outrages may be viewed, but this post’s perspective will use the frameworks of human rights, oppression and empowerment.

 

Historical trauma, gender-based violence

Historical trauma, devastating assimilation policies, and continuing oppression have rendered Indigenous communities in the U.S. extremely vulnerable to human rights violations, and disproportionately high rates of poverty and violence. Four out of five Indigenous persons have suffered a violent crime in their lifetime; four out of five perpetrators of this violence are non-Indigenous (Nagle and Steinem, 2016).  American Indian and Alaska Native women suffer sexual violence at the highest rate of any racial group, per capita, in the U.S. (Brewer, 2017).

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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Innovating Gang Violence Prevention Through Social Media – #MacroSW Chat 11-16-17

We’re hosting this week’s #MacroSW chat – join us as we explore Desmond Patton’s innovative approach for preventing gun violence in Chicago. This is reblogged from macrosw.com .

Our guest expert this week is Desmond Upton Patton, Ph.D., who will discuss how analyzing Twitter data (though digital qualitative research) can help us understand how social media communications –around grief, trauma, or love– can lead to off-line gun violence.

Street with yellow tape "police line do not cross" tied across it. Red brick buidlings in backgrounc with police car with blue lights on top of it. Photo: Joshua Lott, Getty Images

Using data sets from Chicago, he hopes his research will help prevent murders and provide insight into healthy ways to intervene and cope with trauma. The participation of youth as translators of the tweets – telling the story within the story – help social workers identify moments that are prime for intervention. As an introduction to this chat’s topic, please watch this 12-minute video, a 2017 Ted X Broadway Talk by Dr. Patton:

They Are Children: How Posts on Social Media Lead to Gang Violence

“While social media often portrays a curated version of people’s lives, it can also help tell a more complete…

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Using Technology for Social Work Scholarship: Creating and Sharing your Work

Reblogged from:

Laurel Hitchcock’s Blog

 

This post was written and edited by Nancy J. SmythMelanie Sage, and myself as part of our collaboration on our forthcoming book, Teaching Social Work with Digital Technology, to be published by CSWE Press in 2018.

Social and digital technologies offer many tools and opportunities to create and disseminate scholarship in social work.  For example, social work educators can use blogs, podcasts, videos, and infographics to create and share content for professional purposes.  To see an example of how to use infographics, please see Harnessing Technology for Social Work Scholarship (Hitchcock & Sage, 2017).  This blog post describes two social work academics are using social media to share their research with others.

Dr. Jimmy A. Young, an Assistant Professor of social work at California State University San Marcos, shares how he uses social media to disseminate his research:

Social media technologies offer exciting opportunities to disseminate scholarship with a broader audience and share your research with others. A few examples include using Twitter to share a quick highlight or quote with a direct link to the article, a blog post with a longer quote or summary and direct link to the article, or some sort of video message on YouTube or Snapchat that also shares a summary and direct link. Today’s social media users enjoy rich content and video is an engaging way to share articles with others. I have also been successful in using professional academic social networks such as ResearchGate or Academia.edu to host articles, post summaries and links, as well as to connect with others working in a similar area. The great thing about these websites is you can get some analytics that can be useful for demonstrating your scholarly impact. . . .

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Pioneering the Grand Challenges on Social Media as Macro Practice: #MacroSW at #APM17

I’m pleased to be part of this presentation!
Pat Shelly

On October 20, 2017,  four of the #MacroSW partners will be in Dallas at the Council of Social Work Education’s 2017 Annual Program Meeting to present about how our online community is supporting the American Academy of Social Work and Social Welfare’s Social Work Grand Challenges.   

Date: Saturday, October 21, 2017

Time: 2:00 PM

Room Assignment: Sheraton Dallas Hotel City View 2, Main Hotel, 4th floor

The presenters include:

This presentation, titled Pioneering the Grand Challenges on Social Media as Macro Practice, will inform…

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