Digital Technology for Social Work Practice with Laurel Hitchcock: #MacroSW Chat — Jan. 23, 2020

#MacroSW Twitter Chats are held each Thursday night at 9 PM Eastern / 8 PM Central / 6 PM Pacific.

Welcome to the first #MacroSW chat of 2020!
Recently, the chat organizers made a commitment to address White Supremacy in social work. For this chat, we ask that you keep in mind the following:

What effect does White Supremacy have on access and utilization of technology in professional practice?
How do social workers in professional practice experience or observe White Supremacy in regard to the use of technology? Do you or your colleagues see areas of concern? These questions provide a lens with which to consider digital technology in social work practice and can enrich discussions about our profession.

In the inaugural Spring 2020 #MacroSW Chat,  “Digital Technology for Social Work Practice,” we will look at how social work practitioners can use digital technology in our practice. Laurel Hitchcock @laurelhitchcock https://twitter.com/laurelhitchcock, whose blog “Teaching and Learning in Social Work” https://www.laureliversonhitchcock.org/, regularly addresses digital and other technology will lead the chat.  We hope to hear from practitioners, as well as students who are developing their own digital literacy and professional use of this technology.

Hosted by the University at Buffalo School of Social Work @UBSSW https://twitter.com/UBSSW

See the entire Spring 2020 schedule of chats here: https://macrosw.com/chat-schedule/
The chats will discuss white supremacy in social work (on April 9, 2020), immigration, organized labor, policy-focused and nontraditional jobs, decolonizing field education, and lots more.

New to twitter chats? Here are some answers to frequently asked questions: https://macrosw.com/macrosw-twitter-chat-faqs/.

Discussion Questions:

Q1: Why do #SocialWorker need to incorporate social & digital technology into their practice with clients and communities?

Q2: What are the benefits of using technology in #socialwork practice with clients & communities?

Q3:  What are the challenges of using technology in #socialwork practice with clients & communities?

Q4: In what ways might digital technology empower marginalized populations and communities? How could #Socialworkers support marginalized populations with digital technology?
(Note: In terms of race, class, ethnicity, national origin, gender identity and more, “marginalized communities” may or may not have overarching commonalities. Different marginalized communities may have idiosyncratic issues that chat participants might want to address.)

Q5: How do you use digital technology in your #socialwork practice? Or how would you like to use it?

Q6: As a helping professional, what do you want to learn more about related to using digital & social technology in professional practice?

smartphone so me icons DOCFORCE

Photo: Docforce

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Resources:

Developing a Professional & Ethical Online Presence for Social Work Practice (Conference Presentation) (10/2/19) with Allison Curington https://www.laureliversonhitchcock.org/?s=Developing+a+Professional+%26+Ethical+Online+Presence+for+Social+Work+Practice

Three Ways to Model Good Boundaries with Technology in Social Work Ed (9/2/19) https://www.laureliversonhitchcock.org/2019/09/03/three-ways-to-model-good-boundaries-with-technology-in-social-work-ed/

What is a Professional Collaboration Network (PCN) & why do you need one? (12/17/19) https://www.laureliversonhitchcock.org/2019/12/17/what-is-a-professional-collaboration-network-and-why-do-you-need-one/

#SWDE2019 Keynote – What role will Social Workers choose in shaping the digital future? (4/13/19) with Laurel Hitchcock, Melanie Sage & Nancy J. Smyth https://www.laureliversonhitchcock.org/2019/04/13/swde2019-keynote-what-role-will-social-workers-choose-in-shaping-the-digital-future/

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For Social Work Educators:
Hitchcock, L.I., , Melanie Sage, and Nancy J. Smyth. (2019). Teaching Social Work with Digital Technology. Alexandria, VA: CSWE Press. https://www.cswe.org/Bookstore/Books/Teaching-Social-Work-With-Digital-Technology

Learn more about the #SWTech online community:
#SWTech: The Beginnings of an Online Community (3/31/19)

#SWTech – An Introduction and History of the Online Group (8/15/19) with Melanie Sage, Jonathan Singer & Nancy J. Smyth

Our Guest Expert:

LaurelHitchcock Laurel Hitchcock, MPH, MSW, PhD, is an Associate Professor in the Department of Social Work at the University of Alabama at Birmingham. She was a regular host and contributor to the #MacroSW Chat from 2014 through 2018. Laurel co-authored “Teaching Social Work with Digital Technology,” (2019), with Melanie Sage and Nancy Smyth. She is co-founder of  #SWVirtualPal, with Dr Amanda M L Taylor-Beswick; this is an online community for social workers from around the globe, encouraging collaboration on international projects. Her “Teaching and Learning in Social Work”blog: https://www.laureliversonhitchcock.org/.  Follow her on Twitter at @laurelhitchcock.

 

Connecting Beyond the Conference: #MacroSW Chat 10-24-19

Reblogged from https://macrosw.com/2019/10/21/connecting-beyond-the-conference-macrosw-chat-10-24-19/

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

For this week’s #MacroSW chat, Stephen Cummings and Pat Shelly will be hosting, direct from the Council of Social Work Education’s 19th Annual Program Meeting (#APM19) in Denver. Yes, Stephen and Pat will be chatting about the conference while at the conference. #APM19 will host thousands of CSWE members, including social work professors, program members, and graduate students. The event is a way for research to be shared, missions and philosophies to be discussed, and to meet people to add to our networks. We invite all those #NotAtAPM19 to join in with your questions and comments.

We’ll be using #MacroSW and #APM19 hashtags for this chat.

Some questions for discussion:

1. What benefits have you experienced attending a professional or academic conference?
(This can be any conference, whether it’s local, state, national, or international).

2. What are the major concerns with large-scale conferences like the #APM?

3. CSWE APM Theme for 2019: Social Work Education: Looking Back, Looking Forward –
What do you see when you look back at #SocWorkEd? What do you see looking forward?

4. Attendees of #APM19: What are you excited about this year? Please post your own
presentations.

5. Those #NotAtAPM19 – what questions do you have?

Join us at 9 p.m. EDT / 7 p.m. MDT for the #MacroSW Twitter chat, live from Denver, Colorado.

Social Justice at the Crossroads of Environmental Justice and Reproductive Justice

by Meschelle Linjean

Editor’s Note: This is an extended version of the #MacroSW blog post for a 9-19-19 Twitter Chat www.macrosw.com

Our profession has called for inclusion of reproductive justice issues in social work education to promote self-determination in accordance with the NASW Code of Ethics (West, 2013). NASW included environmental justice as a 2018-2019 social justice priority (NASW, 2019). The focus of this chat will consider how environmental justice and reproductive justice are connected, and how this is expressed in our social work practice to advance social justice.

As the U.S. rolls back environmental policies aimed at curbing climate change and limiting air and water contamination, it is simultaneously opening more areas to environmental degradation (Gibbens, 2019).  Women, racial/ethnic minorities, low-income workers, and other vulnerable populations remain disproportionately exposed to hazardous chemicals that adversely affect reproductive health and children’s development. Additionally, as Indigenous communities lose their traditional cultural practices tied to the natural world, their capacity to pass on cultural knowledge to future generations declines.

Green tree with trunk that is shaped like the torso of a woman. Scales of justice are balanced on tree's lower limbs. There is a yello sun or ovun in the crown, and a yello speim heading up the trunk toward the egg.wiht a

Art: Neal Keller

Reproductive justice in the U.S. is rapidly regressing as lawmakers pass legislation that severely restricts access to and funding for sex education, family planning, women’s health services, birth control, and abortion services. Serious inadequacies in maternity and family leave, childcare support, and access to women’s and children’s healthcare continue unabated.This disproportionately affects those with low-income; undocumented immigrants; migrants; and racial/ethnic minority women and families.  African Americans and American Indians/Alaska Natives experience the highest maternal and infant mortality rates. Also affected are LGBTQ2S+ individuals, who face high rates of family planning discrimination. Individuals with disabilities experience high rates of rape and other sexual violence.

Intersectionality, ecology, and policy must be considered to address these conditions and arrive at social justice. The Ethical Principles section of the NASW Code of Ethics (2017) states that social workers challenge social injustice by pursuing social change with and on behalf of the vulnerable and oppressed, to promote sensitivity to and knowledge about oppression and diversity and ensure access to information, services, and resources; equality of opportunity; and meaningful participation in decision making for all people.

It is important for social workers to consider how environmental justice and reproductive justice are connected, and how this is expressed in our social work practice to advance social justice.

References

National Women’s Law Center. (n.d.). If you really care about environmental justice, you should care about reproductive justice! Retrieved from https://nwlc.org/wp-content/…/FactSheetEnvironmentalJusticeandReproJustice.pdf

Energy Justice Network (n.d.). Principles of environmental justice. Retrieved from
http://www.ejnet.org/principles.html

Gaard, G. (2010). Reproductive technology, or reproductive justice? An ecofeminist, environmental justice perspective on the rhetoric of choice. Ethics & the Environment, 15(2), 103–130. https://doi.org/10.2979/ETE.2010.15.2.103

Gibbens, S. (2019, February 1). 15 ways the Trump administration has changed environmental policies. National Geographic. Retrieved from https://www.nationalgeographic.com/environment/2019/02/15-ways-trump-administration-impacted-environment/

Grand Challenges for Social Work. (2019). Create social responses to a changing environment. Retrieved from
http://grandchallengesforsocialwork.org/grand-challenges-initiative/12-challenges/create-social-responses-to-a-changing-environment/ (see: Table 1. pp 16-17)

Gute, D. M., Siqueira, E., Goldberg, J. S., Galvão, H., Chianelli, M., & Pirie, A. (2009). The Vida Verde Women’s Co-Op: Brazilian immigrants organizing to promote environmental and social justice. American Journal of Public Health, 99(S3), S495–S498. https://doi.org/10.2105/AJPH.2008.148528

Hoover, E., Cook, K., Plain, R., Sanchez, K., Waghiyi, V., Miller, P., Carpenter, D. O.(2012). Indigenous peoples of North America: Environmental exposures and reproductive justice. Environmental Health Perspectives, 120(12), 1645–1649. https://doi.org/10.1289/ehp.1205422

Mosley, E. A., Bouse, C. K., & Stidham Hall, K. (2015). Water, human rights, and reproductive justice: Implications for women in Detroit and Monrovia. Environmental Justice (19394071), 8(3), 78–85.
https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6141208/

Murphy, V., Zajicek, A. Norris, A. and Hamilton, L.  (Eds.) (2009). Introduction. In Incorporating intersectionality in social work: Practice, research, policy and education (pp 1-3).  Washington DC: NASW Press. Retrieved from https://www.naswpress.org/publications/practice/inside/intersectionality-in-social-work-intro.html

National Association of Social Workers. (2017). Code of ethics. Retrieved from
https://www.socialworkers.org/About/Ethics/Code-of-Ethics/Code-of-Ethics-English

National Association of Social Workers. (2019). Social justice priorities, 2018-2019. Retrieved from https://www.socialworkers.org/Advocacy/Social-Justice/Social-Justice-Priorities

National Association of Social Workers New Jersey Chapter. (n.d.). Environmental justice is social justice. Retrieved from https://naswnj.site-ym.com/page/envjustice/Environmental-Justice.htm

Sister Song. (n.d.). Reproductive justice. Retrieved from https://www.sistersong.net/reproductive-justice

Wehrmann, K. C. (n.d.). Environmental justice challenge awaits. Retrieved from https://www.socialworkers.org/News/NASW-News/ID/1604/Environmental-justice-challenge-awaits

West, R. L. (2013, March 21). Interview with Social Workers for Reproductive Justice Maggie Rosenbloom. Social Work Helper. Retrieved from https://www.socialworkhelper.com/2013/03/21/interview-with-social-workers-for-reproductive-justice/

Zimmerman, K. & Miao, V. (2009). Fertile ground: Women organizing at the intersection of environmental justice and reproductive justice. Retrieved from www.racialequitytools.org/resourcefiles/zimmerman.pdf  (especially pp. 26-27; 29-33).

 

Meschelle Linjean: She is smiling. She has long dark hair and wears a purple patterned top. We see the left earring, many strands of small beads.

Meschelle Linjean

An enrolled citizen of the Cherokee Nation and originally from northeastern Oklahoma, Meschelle Linjean currently lives in Alexandria, Virginia, and is in her third year of the University at Buffalo’s part-time, online MSW program. She is scheduled to graduate in August 2020. Meschelle’s recent work includes collecting data on social determinants of health among patients at a federally qualified health center and coordinating efforts with community social service organizations to link patients with non-medical services aimed at improving their health and wellbeing. She completed her first field placement in the foster care division of the Department of Family Services in Fairfax County, Virginia, and will complete her advanced field placement at Native American Lifelines, a non-profit, Indian Health Service-contracted, program that provides trauma informed and culturally centered care to promote health and social resiliency among Urban Natives living in and around Baltimore, Maryland. Meschelle is particularly interested in culturally centered paradigms for understanding and addressing individual, family, and community distress. She hopes to continue working to improve health outcomes for those who have endured historical trauma, intergenerational trauma and adverse childhood experiences (ACEs). She also has an interest in ecological/environmental social work and the connections between health, well being, and disruptions to implementing traditional ecological knowledge.

How to cite this blog post:

Linjean, M. (2019, September 13). Promoting Social Justice At the Crossroads: Environmental and Reproductive Justice. [Blog Post]. Retrieved from:
https://socialworksynergy.org/2019/09/13/promoting-social-justice-at-the-crossroads-of-environmental-justice-and-reproductive-justice-macrosw-chat-sept-19-2019/

A Teacher’s Guide to Bullying Infographic

by Pat Shelly and Corinne Fiegl

Corinne Fiegl is a MSW student at the University at Buffalo School of Social Work, and the creator of this infographic.  During her foundation year 2018-19, her field placement was in a Buffalo Public School, working with PreK- 8th grade students. This year, as part of the Hartford Partnership Program in Aging Education Program (HPPAE), she will be at the Amherst (NY) Center for Senior Services. She will graduate in May 2020.

Corinne facing camera and smiling. Young white woman, wearing a blue patterned shirt. She has long blonde hair.

Corinne chose bullying as the topic of this infographic as part of a social work course assignment during the Spring 2019 semester. Students were asked to create an infographic that addresses a macro issue affecting the clientele served in one’s internship. Bullying is an issue in schools across the nation; she began to see it firsthand in the interactions among the students at her placement. She hopes to raise awareness about bullying and its effects, and that the infographic will serve as a quick checklist on resources for teachers to use in prevention efforts or interventions. Teachers are trained on this topic, and certainly most have seen student-to-student bullying, but having an “on-hand” resource to address bullying could make a difference in the lives of their students and improve safety in the school. It is also a reminder of just how widespread it is: one in three report being bullied.

In planning this infographic, she found it was important to organize information carefully to make a clear and concise infographic. Corinne’s hope is that “A Teacher’s Guide to Bullying” will educate readers and encourage other school social work interns to make a difference in their work environments.

 

This infographic is sharable, with no changes, and with credit to Corinne Fiegl, under Creative Commons license
CC BY-ND.

Attribution-NoDerivs

 

This infographic, A Teacher's Guide to Bullying, has modes of bullying, types, frequencies, traits targeted by bullies, signs, impact, and interventions. Illustrated with paper cut-outs of humans, a sad face, drwing of a brain, and a silhouwette of a man in a suit with a pointer.

A Teacher’s Guide to Bullying by Corinne Fiegl  CC BY-ND

 

 

 

 

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